WIC and the nutrient intake of children
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WIC and the nutrient intake of children by Victor J. Oliveira

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in Washington, DC .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States,
  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children (U.S.),
  • Food relief -- United States -- Evaluation.,
  • Children -- United States -- Nutrition.,
  • Food stamps -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementVictor Oliveira, Craig Gundersen.
SeriesFood Assistance and Nutrition Research report ;, no. 5
ContributionsGundersen, Craig., United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHV696.F6 O45 2000
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 22 p. :
Number of Pages22
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6831952M
LC Control Number00325607
OCLC/WorldCa43958707

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Downloadable! After controlling for self-selection bias, participation in the WIC program (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) has a significant positive effect on children's intakes of iron, folate, and vitamin B Iron is one of the five nutrients targeted by the program, the others being protein, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C. Folate and vitamin B WIC and the nutrient intake of children (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Victor J Oliveira; Craig Gundersen; United States. Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service. Of these children, 73 did not participate in the NSLP themselves. This is the strategy used by Oliveira and Gunderson () when estimating the impact of WIC participation on children's nutrient. In phase I, the committee was tasked with assessing nutrient intakes of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)-eligible populations. The committee first conducted a review of the literature specific to WIC participants. Next, the committee analyzed National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data to evaluate current nutrient intakes.

This appendix presents the methodology and detailed results for the analyses of nutrient and food group intakes and diet quality of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants and WIC-eligible subgroups using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).The WIC subgroup was defined as the subgroup of individuals .   Background: A recent report of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) outlined priority nutrients for infants and children participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).Objective: The objective of this study was to assess usual nutrient intakes from foods and beverages (not supplements) amongCited by:   WIC is found to increase the intakes of three of the four important nutrients for WIC children, including iron, potassium, and fiber. SNAP only has a small and negative effect on fiber intake. The additional benefit of SNAP participation is non-existent given participation in WIC. Recent studies have assessed diet quality of low-income U.S. children participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), but differences by race/ethnicity remain unknown. We assessed racial/ethnic disparities in nutrient intake from dietary sources (not supplements) among children participating in WIC, with a focus on priority nutrients and food.

A major task in Phase I is to identify nutrients of concern among WIC-eligible subgroups. This task involves using the new Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) and the methods recently published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM, a) to assess the nutrient adequacy of the diets of WIC-eligible subgroups. To date, no published studies have reported such analyses. in the WIC Program, hemoglobin, hematocrit, or other hematological tests are performed to screen for iron deficiency anemia. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), developed by the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board, are four nutrient-based reference values intended for planning and assessing diets. This Guide, primarily focused on nutrition for the healthy full-term infant, is a research-based resource for WIC staff who provide nutrition education and counseling to the parents and caregivers of infants (from birth to one year old). It has been updated to reflect current research and guidelines about infant health, nutrition, and feeding. Using the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) and the methods described by the Institute of Medicine (IOM, a) to assess nutrient adequacy, the committee assessed the nutrient adequacy of the diets of categorical WIC subgroups—WIC infants under 1 year of age, WIC children 1 through 4 years of age, and pregnant, lactating, and non-breast.